In a futuristic world where robots are identical to humans, save one thing – their lifespan – we meet our protagonists, Isla and Tsukasa, in an elevator. For a minute I was expecting a lovey dovey moment based on the opening. I’m kinda glad it didn’t go in that route.

I’m honestly glad that I wasn’t in for another highschool anime – I have a few of those on my plate this season and I was glad to see an adult anime come into my lineup.

Plastic memories interested me when I heard of it because it reminded me a lot of both Chobits and DearS, two series’s I enjoyed very much. The premise seems far more realistic, though the element of boy meets girl remains the same.

Tsukasa joins the ‘termination service’ on his first day of work, which is the section in charge of collecting Giftia’s that have reached their lifespan of 81, 920 hours (9 years and 4 months). We meet the team, which consists of of teams of a giftia and human.

Sending off that whom you consider a son has got to be hard, no matter what.

Sending off that whom you consider a son has got to be hard, no matter what.

The first episode mostly introduces the characters, and that to me is the only real downside of the series. Everyone is so cliche that it’s nothing to really write home about. Tsukasa is your normal dude, Isla is your standard moe silent type, you’ve got a tsundere and a shota, and a fiery red headed boss. Michiru, the tsundere, is what I really hate about the character achetype – she’s just plain BITCHY. Frankly, if I was in Tsukasa’s shoes I would’ve reported her for being plain RUDE.

Either way, one thing I DID enjoy about this series was the emotional aspect of it. You’re literally seeing people regarded as practically human lose both their memories and sense of self as they’re terminated – a death of sorts. And of course, there are mixed reactions to the termination crew – from acceptance, to runaways, to people who outright refuse to answer the door of their homes, as is the case of the last case.

To echo what Tsukasa said in the first few seconds of the episode, what must it be like to know when you're going to 'die'?

To echo what Tsukasa said in the first few seconds of the episode, what must it be like to know when you’re going to ‘die’?

Isla’s own fears about when her time comes, being a giftia herself, is something I expected from the series, as well.

Either way, it’s a rather poignent series with decent animation, nice music and an overall interesting storyline. I maybe biased there, as robot animes are my favourites.

Out of 5,

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